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20120928
20121006
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MSNBC 6
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
the law. >> the founders were very clear on this. the judiciary should be insulated from political pressure. you have the executive, you have the legislative branches, both of them elected. but the judiciary should be insulated. what say you to that? >> what i say to that is that they were meant to be independent to make law or to execute law on their own. and when that happens, the balance of power has to come in, either the legislative branch has to hold them accountable. we have a split legislature. so they couldn't do it. or the governor needs to hold them accountable. the governor won't do it. the opinion has never been executed. so it's the people of iowa who have to hold them accountable. we agree that the judiciary should be free of politics. well don't want them looking over their shoulder except to stay within their constitutional parameters, because god help us all if we allow a court to be independent to make law and execute law, because we call that tyranny, not liberty. and that's what we -- >> there are also those who would argue that the word that you use is activis
warnings out. they say they are hypothetical. lockheed martin says it is the law. we must send the out the notices. the administration says if you don't send out the warnings, then we'll indem anyify you, we'll cover lawsuits that might result if there are layoffs. so the taxpayer is on the hook for not sending out these warning notices. it's pure politics. martha: it's unbelievable, frankly. either we are going to have these defense cut layoffs as a result of sequestration because nobody in washington seems to be able to come together on a budget deal. don't they have to face the ramifications of that and say we are going to have these defense cuts and that means we have to do due diligence and let these people know the perhaps they work on are in jeopardy? >> these cuts in the defense department are threatened as of january 1. it's the law, it's written in stone that you have to warn defense department employees and the contractors that layoffs may be coming. that's the law. the administration is getting around this law with a different interpretation to indemnify lockheed martin. it
. >> this isn't about terrorism. these are regular law enforcement investigations, and this is, this is, investigating people's communications. these are, who they talked to. who they e-mailed. who they engage in online conversations with, their friends, family, colleagues and loved once. >> reporter: here are some facts gathered by the aclu from justice department document. between 2009 and 2011 the number of orders for surveillance went up 60%. e-mails and network data, while smaller in number, increased by 361%. this type of information used to be gathered from devices attached right to the telephone but now, it can easily be retrieved by the phone company internally. aclu says it is done without a judge considering merits of the case. but the department of justice fired back saying in a statement, in every instance cited here the federal judge authorized law enforcement activity as criminals increasingly use new and sophisticated technologies use of orders used by a judge and strictly authorized by congress is essential for law enforcement to carry out its duty and to protect the pu
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
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of states like in wisconsin and probably in pennsylvania you're having voter i.d. laws which is probably one of the most common form of voter suppression put in place. then the courts are blocking it. in south carolina, in texas doj has been blocking a lot of the efforts and so there is a sort of like two steps backwards one step forward process going on here. where a lot of states are trying to make voting laws worse but we're seeing a pushback from the courts and the department of justice. >> bill: okay. but it has been -- over 20 where there have been attempts, right? >> that's right. they're very calm and they take very different forms. >> bill: i was going to get to that. let's talk about some of the forms. what is the most common form? voter i.d.? >> probably the most common is voter i.d. this is a kind of bait and switch. the way that voter i.d. works is it is sort of intuitive to people that you should show i.d. to prove you are who you are at the polls. people are worried about voter fraud. a lot o
't bother showing up to vote. in the real world it is a consequence of what people believe the law is in pennsylvania. before the ruling this week, when the law stated that you did need an id to vote. here is what votespa.com told voters. here is what the splash page website greets voters as of earlier this week. that small print after the judge's ruling, after it became clear that you do not need to have an id to vote in pennsylvania, you are welcome at the polling place, here is how they changed the website, you ready? look at that difference. oh yes, there it is. a change in the small print. but the impression is pretty much the same. if you don't have a driver's license don't show up. this is going on in other states. states where they were not able to change the law. where there is still an effort to make people think they need an id to vote. in idahoidaho, here is what thee is distributing. bring your id and vote. you hear about things like this every election year. it is another thing for it to be your state. your state using your tax dollars to miss inform you about your ri
don't understand where that law came from, i thought a majority is anything that's above 50%, and i don't know where this 60% came from. maybe you could enlighten us on exactly the origin of that filibuster law. host: well, andy, that would take way too long for me to explain, but perhaps we'll do that as a segment on the "washington journal" and take our viewers and listeners through the intricacies of the rules of the house and senate. but thanks for your call. we're going to move on to ron on our line for democrats, calling from florida. good morning, ron. caller: good morning. host: ron, divided party -- one party or divided government? caller: well, that question is -- the underlying point is you're saying a -- in essence, what you're saying is a one-party state, and that just doesn't work. it was proved in the soviet union and the place where i immigrated from, which was cuba. the problem is, as someone said, this is not your father's republican party. when you have a new crop signing a pledge before they even take office that allows them no room to negotiate, on top of that,
. >> right. >> the law does make that illegal and, therefore, the workers in each case have to make the determination, are they prepared to break the law. >> but just going back to that graph you showed. a huge reason why lockouts are a higher percentage of strikes, there are almost no strikes anymore. >> exactly. >> there was 19 strikes in 2011 and, you know, 12 and 10 before then. we haven't had more than 20 strikes in companies, more than a thousand people for years and years. in the '80s there were hundreds of strikes. unions are getting less powerful. a lot of lockouts is one of the huge issues with every union is pensions. they're portrayed as a time bomb. they are an onerous cost because of health care and other things. and you lock out workers who have a contract that the owner thinks is paying them too much. it's why companies -- it's kind of -- i love covering sports, but when i have to spend so much time on the nfl and no one ever says anything about the american sugar crystal lockout which is going on over a year and people are not making $150,000 which the part-time ref
. not to apply to college, not to apply to law school, and not to get hired for any job. i was listed in a directory as -- i listed myself as native-american. i was listed there, it's part of who i am. >> do you consider yourself a minority? >> i consider myself as having a native american background. that's what i said, that's what i am. >> no one's questioning what her parents told her when she was younger all the way through that time frame. but when she was asked by the "boston herald," why is harvard touting her as a woman of color, native american, she said she didn't know. and after five weeks of misleading the papers she said i self-reported and she's never answered why she, in fact, did that. >> okay. one notable line came when senator brown was interrupted while trying to explain why he voted against democratic-backed bills. >> she's obviously misat a timing the facts. these were rejection by both democrats and republicans, professor. it wasn't -- if you're going to comment on my record, i would at least have you refer to -- excuse me -- >> is this going to be -- >> go ahead
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)